Workshop & Lecture Recording Library

You can purchase recordings of our most popular workshops and lectures here. Recordings are for individual use only. Please do not distribute recording files to others.

WORKSHOP: Our lives course with stories, stories that run through us from ancestors, stories we tell others and tell ourselves, and stories of which we are unaware and thereby tell us. We will reflect on the role these stories play in the shaping of our lives, and how they invite us to greater consciousness of what invisibly informs the visible world.: James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in Houston, Texas, Director of the Saybrook Graduate School Jungian Studies program in San Francisco, and author of thirteen books, the latest being What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life.

LECTURE: Our lives course with stories, stories that run through us from ancestors, stories we tell others and tell ourselves, and stories of which we are unaware and thereby tell us. We will reflect on the role these stories play in the shaping of our lives, and how they invite us to greater consciousness of what invisibly informs the visible world. James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in Houston, Texas, Director of the Saybrook Graduate School Jungian Studies program in San Francisco, and author of thirteen books, the latest being What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life.

WORKSHOP: What is our personal Shadow, and how may we bring into greater awareness that which troubles consciousness? This workshop will engage in discussion, exemplification, and questions designed to help participants gain a greater awareness of the personal Shadow. : James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst and the executive director of the Jung Educational Center of Houston, Texas. He is the author of 50 articles, reviews, and twelve books, including The Middle Passage: From Misery to Meaning at Mid-Life; On This Journey We Call Our Life; The Eden Project: In Search of the Magical Other; Creating a Life: Finding…

LECTURE: Finding meaning in the second half of life requires our recovering a sense of personal authority, striking a balance between obligation to others and duty to self, and constructing a mature spirituality. How do we recover the parts left behind? What are the ways in which we can grow as persons throughout this journey, and find ourselves increasingly at home with the person we are becoming? James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst and the executive director of the Jung Educational Center of Houston, Texas. He is the author of 50 articles, reviews, and eleven books, including The Middle…

WORKSHOP: This workshop continues the discussion of the lecture topic. You will be challenged to discern your own values, be accountable for them, and summoned to the courage to live them. James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Houston, Texas. He is Director Emeritus of the Jung Center of Houston and the Philemon Foundation. He is a Professor for the Saybrook University Jungian Studies program, offered in Houston, and author of fourteen books, most recently What Matters Most: Living a More Considered Life.

LECTURE: What are the sources of guidance for a thoughtful person in our country amid political fractionation, animosity, divisive ideologies, and numbing distractions—a time in which the individual has an enormous summons to social, psychological, and spiritual integrity? This presentation will challenge the audience to assume responsibility for a thoughtful, discerned, and experientially verified authority, one which bases itself on respect for others, but also embodies a willingness to show up, to be different, and to stand for something real.: James Hollis, Ph.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in Houston, Texas. He is Director Emeritus of the Jung Center…

LECTURE: Our ancestors believed in ghosts, and perhaps they were not far off the mark as so much of daily life is driven by invisible psychic forces, archaic agendas, and imperious admonitions and prohibitions, all the more powerful because they operate unconsciously. What are the features of such “hauntings,” and how might we gain some further foothold on a more conscious conduct of life? The lecture will explore the concept of personal hauntings. The role of the unconscious in the conduct of daily life will be examined. The significance of “complex” theory as a useful tool for self-examination and psychotherapy will…

LECTURE: One of the richest of Jung's contributions to our understanding of psyche is the idea of the Shadow, those parts of our own being which are threatening to our ego, and which so often act independently of our wills. The Shadow is not evil, as such, though it may bring great harm to self and others, and it may also bring healing energies to bear. Shadow work is not only an invitation to further integration of our split off components but brings our greatest contribution to our families and our society.: James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst and…

WORKSHOP: "We can never be free to create our lives if we are in service to fixed, internalized, and largely unconscious ideas. We will engage questions which stir, sift, and raise the consciousness of those deeply ingrained ideas which create or repeat patterns in our lives, for with consciousness comes the power to choose more freely." James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst, author of nine books, most recently Creating a Life and On This Journey We Call Our Life, and executive director of the Jung Educational Center of Houston, Texas.

LECTURE: Can we create our lives, or does life create us? How is it that we are free but choose such repetitive, self-defeating patterns? How does fate collide with destiny and catch us in between? What are the sources of those replications, and what the insights we need to maximize such freedom as we may have? These are the questions which haunt the modern who, wishing freedom, creates repetitions, yet longs for an authentic journey.: James Hollis, Ph.D., is a Zurich-trained Jungian analyst, author of nine books, most recently Creating a Life and On This Journey We Call Our Life, and…

WORKSHOP: Trauma survivors often report that their lives are a “living Hell.” This pathological situation is created by the psyche's archetypal defenses and their depressive power over what one psychoanalyst called “the lost heart of the self,” with its desire for love and intimate relationship. Dante's Divine Comedy gives us a beautiful literary example of such a companioned descent, as Virgil and Dante descend into the nether regions in order to heal the poet's mid-life depression. Dr. Kalsched shows how depth psychotherapy in conjunction with affective neuro-science, and the findings of attachment theory and relational theory all lead toward answers of…

LECTURE: Dr. Kalsched describes a series of dramatic moments in the psychotherapy of trauma survivors where a breakthrough occurred in the client's access to dissociated feelings. These moments usually occurred when “transitional space”—long since foreclosed by trauma—was re-opened between therapist and patient, and the psyche's mytho-poetic matrix re-potentiated. One sign of this “re-potentiation” is the vivid dreams that often occur at such moments—dreams in which a lost or abandoned “child” appears—often menaced by the psyche's oppressive powers. He shows the parallels between these dreams and those ancient myths that describe the birth and trials of the archetypal Hero—the one who always…

WORKSHOP: Patients who have suffered severe early trauma often find themselves bewitched by dark tyrannical voices assaulting them from within, leading to intense anxiety and depression. In dream work with such patients, the dark inner voices reveal themselves as both archaic and typical--hence archetypal--personifications whose inner purpose seems to be the defense of a vulnerable core of selfhood to make sure it is never violated again. However, in defending the true self against further trauma, the archetypal defenses also persecute and demoralize it, cutting off all hope for life-in-relationship to others. Under these conditions, the positive side of the Self cannot…

LECTURE: Experiences in early childhood that cause unbearable psychic pain or anxiety (trauma) can leave the personality and the human spirit threatened with destruction. To avoid this, a defensive splitting of the self occurs in which a "progressed" part of the self casts a spell over a "regressed" part and locks it up in an inner sanctum for safekeeping. This self-encapsulation is out pictured in dreams during the psychological process. In this lecture, using dream examples from the clinical situation and the fairy tale of Rapunzel, we will see how the wisdom of the psyche's archetypal defenses saves the imperishable personal…

WORKSHOP:  Three additional central themes in Jung’s Red Book for our concentration are: the role of the inferior function; Jung’s experience of God-images and God; Eros-Logos and Jung’s notion of anima/animus. Ann Belford Ulanov Ph.D., L.H.D. is a Jungian analyst in private practice in New York City. She is the Christiane Brooks Johnson Memorial Professor of Psychiatry and Religion at Union Theological Seminary; a member of the Jungian Psychoanalytical Association; author of numerous books and articles, including, with her late husband Barry Ulanov, Cinderella and her Sisters: The Envying and the Envied, and by herself The Unshuttered Heart: Opening to Aliveness…

LECTURE: Early in The Red Book Jung says, "You live your life fully if you also live what you have not yet lived. This is knowledge of the heart" you can attain...only by living your life to the full." This means facing the dead. The dead are what we should have lived and have not, and irreparable losses we have suffered. To live these, because my life wants itself whole, also means to approach the border between personal and impersonal psyche, to create personal meaning in the impersonal events that happen to us, and to yield personal strivings to the Well-Being…

WORKSHOP:  To feel alive and not dead is as basic as our need for food, air, and water. Fear of this lies at the root of illness. In this workshop, we will explore the unconscious ways we make parts of ourselves dead and what spaces offer themselves for regeneration. : Ann Belford Ulanov, M.Div., Ph.D. L.H.D,  is the Christiane Brooks Johnson Professor of Psychiatry and Religion at Union Theological Seminary, a psychoanalyst in private practice, and a supervising analyst and faculty member of the C.G. Jung Institute, New York City. She is the recipient of honorary doctorates from Virginia Theological School…

LECTURE: In the opening years of our new century and under the shadow of terrorist attacks on American soil, these following questions have become urgent: What makes for our sense of aliveness and feeling real? What puts us in touch with our own voice? What confers a sense of finding and creating a path that is true for us? What kills it, making us feel deadness? The focus of this lecture will examine the space of aliveness, which is created between persons, between analysand and analyst, between ego and animus/a, in worship between ritual and repetition compulsion, and in imagination between…